50 (Out of 74) Providers Still Run VPN Servers in Hong Kong

UPDATE: We’ll continue updating this article as we receive more responses and new information from VPN providers. So please bookmark this page and check it out regularly to see if anything’s changed.

Things are tense in Hong Kong right now. The new security law proposed by China got passed by the government in Hong Kong too, and people are scared (and rightly so).

Chinese government bodies are now present in Hong Kong. They plan to control the Internet by blocking “dissident” platforms. The police have new, extremely abusive powers, and the Chinese government can now collect Internet users’ private data in Hong Kong.

Typically, a VPN should help with the online abuses by bypassing firewalls and protecting your privacy. However, some providers have started pulling out of Hong Kong because the authorities might seize their servers or try to intercept online communications.

Because there’s a lot of panic and misinformation going around, finding out which providers continue offering VPN servers in Hong Kong and which don’t can be hard. So we put together this article to help you easily find out.

Note

If your provider doesn’t offer servers in Hong Kong anymore, don’t panic. You get the same security and convenience by using a server in a nearby country like Japan or Singapore.

Recommended reading: Do You Really Need Hong Kong VPN Servers?

Do Top Providers Still Offer VPN Servers in Hong Kong?

We reached out to 74 providers to find out what users should expect. We’ll continuously update this list as we get new information from them. We’ll also use color codes to make the content easier to scan:

  • Yes (50) – VPNs that continue operating servers in Hong Kong. Four of them announced it officially on their blogs.
  • No (13) – Providers who shut down their servers in Hong Kong. Seven of them announced it officially on their blogs.
  • N/A (11) – Providers haven’t responded yet. We’ll update their sections when we hear back from them.

1. ExpressVPN – Yes

We talked with one of their support reps through the live chat feature on their site. They were kind enough to confirm that ExpressVPN didn’t remove their VPN servers in Hong Kong, nor do they plan to do that. Since they don’t keep any logs, they don’t see any reason to do it.

As our VPN servers are already specifically designed not to contain personal or sensitive data on customers, we do not currently have plans to remove Hong Kong as a server location option for users.

Remember also to check their blog regularly or subscribe to it. If anything new develops, you’ll likely see it there first.

Note

ExpressVPN previously dealt with one of their servers being seized by the Turkish authorities. No user data was put at risk because there were no logs.

And while ExpressVPN pulled their physical servers from Turkey, they continue offering access to Turkish VPN servers through virtual locations.

2. NordVPN – Yes

One of their support reps confirmed the provider didn’t pull their servers from Hong Kong, and doesn’t plan to do that at all since they don’t keep any logs. We also reached out to them over email for a more in-depth comment, and got this response:

We are impartial, so we will not give any comments regarding the situation in Hong Kong.

The main goal of NordVPN is to make the Internet as free as possible for everyone. With this in mind, NordVPN strictly keeps no logs of your activity online.

That means we do not track the time or duration of the online session, and neither do we keep logs of IP addresses or servers used, websites visited, or files downloaded.

In other words, none of your private and secure data is logged and gathered at any time.

Currently, there are no plans for shutting down our servers in Hong Kong.

You should also regularly check NordVPN’s blog for new updates.

Note

NordVPN recently completed its second no-logs audit. One of the data centers they worked with suffered a data breach in 2019, which also proved the provider kept zero logs.

3. Surfshark – Yes

We reached out to Surfshark through live chat, and one of their support reps offered us a very detailed response.

Basically, Surfshark doesn’t see any reason to remove their Hong Kong presence because they offer powerful encryption, and don’t keep logs. They also use RAM-only servers, so all data gets wiped when they’re powered on and off (something the authorities would have to do to seize them).

Still, they did say they will shut down their servers if the government forces them to start logging user data.

We are currently monitoring the current situation in Hong Kong, and are ready to adjust our operations based on how it develops. We are confident about the security of our infrastructure as we’ve put a lot of resources into preparing it to counter potential attacks and unauthorized access.

The main reason for not rushing to shut down our servers in Hong Kong is that they are RAM-only and empty of any information as per our no-logs policy.

Additionally, server communications can’t be intercepted as all the traffic is encrypted. Even in the event of server seizure or unauthorized access, there would be no information to be found on any of our servers (in Hong Kong or any other country).

However, if Surfshark received requirements from authorities to start logging user activity, wee would immediately shut down our VPN servers in Hong Kong.

To keep up with Surfshark’s latest updates, follow their blog.

4. PIA – No

PIA’s support redirected us to this article on their blog. The piece explains that the provider decided to shut down its VPN servers in Hong Kong because they’re worried the new national security law could impact their users’ privacy and security.

Effective immediately, Private Internet Access (PIA) is wiping and shutting down our VPN servers located in Hong Kong in response to the new Chinese national security law foisted by fiat on Hong Kong.

The provider’s CMO (Chris Miller) also specified that PIA shutting down their servers doesn’t mean they’ll start blocking online users from Hong Kong. Anyone from that region can freely use PIA.

PIA also said they would set up a Hong Kong exit gateway soon (so a virtual location). So users will still have access to Hong Kong IP addresses, but it might take a while.

Remember to check their blog regularly and their news/announcements portal for the latest updates.

Note

This move shouldn’t worry PIA users. The provider has always been very adamant about not maintaining physical servers in countries that aren’t privacy-friendly. They previously removed servers in Russia, South Korea, South Africa, and Brazil.

5. CyberGhost – Yes

Their Marketing Communication Consultant told us CyberGhost has no plans of leaving the region and pointed us to this article on their site. The piece confirms the provider will continue running servers in Hong Kong.

She was also kind enough to provide us with a quote from Tudor Fulga, Cyberghost’s Head of Infrastructure:

Our servers are as safe in Hong Kong as they are anywhere in the world, all thanks to our strict no-logs policy and rigorous procedures for maintaining our server fleet.

From deployment to retirement, we handle everything ourselves, including the installation of our operating system.

Our servers run on RAM-only, they’re fully encrypted, and every reboot wipes them down. Even if they’re removed from the rack, they’re completely useless and can’t be accessed.
We’re ready to continue serving all our Ghosties in the region.

The article on their blog and the quote help explain how CyberGhost protects users’ privacy on their servers:

  • Their servers only run on RAM. So every reboot (like when someone removes them from the rack) completely wipes them.
  • Furthermore, their servers are fully encrypted and have no ties to CyberGhost’s database or management infrastructure.
  • They don’t keep any logs.
  • No third parties can tamper with their servers. Only CyberGhost’s staff have access to them. They handle everything – including the installation of operating systems.
  • CyberGhost uses self-managed DNS servers and server authenticity tests to eliminate any risk of MITM attacks.

To keep up with CyberGhost’s updates, we recommend following their blog.

Note

CyberGhost did mention that due to their strict security standards, there might be a chance they won’t be able to find data centers in Hong Kong that are willing to work with them if things get worse. However, they said users shouldn’t worry because they’ll definitely find other solutions.

6. TorGuard – Yes

Their support team confirmed their servers are still active. Since they just opened a PoP (Point of Presence) there, it wouldn’t really make sense to close up shop.

The good news is that even if they have to do that, they’ll still be able to offer Hong Kong IP addresses through virtual locations.

Our main server provider just opened a POP there and we just recently moved over, we can also move back to virtual if need be, there is no official word yet, but we will keep everyone updated if that changes.

We suggest following their recommendations and keeping an eye on their blog for the latest updates.

7. Ivacy – Yes

Customer support was able to confirm that their servers are still up and running. They also posted an article on their blog saying the same thing.

These laws implemented by the Chinese authorities may seem outrageous, but all is not lost. It was only a matter of time before Hong Kong was restricted, but fortunately, Ivacy VPN will continue serving its users.

By shutting down our servers, we would take the cheaper and easier way out, but that is not what Ivacy VPN is all about. We have always stood for internet users, and their right to internet freedom and privacy, and will continue to do so while keeping our moral values in check.

Their article explains in-depth how Ivacy VPN guarantees their Hong Kong users get real privacy:

  • They don’t keep any logs. They also have an office in Singapore, so data retention laws aren’t a problem for them.
  • Ivacy was one of VPN Trust Initiative’s first partners, so transparency is obviously important to them. Also, they have a great deal of experience running servers in high-risk regions.
  • They use powerful encryption, secure DNS, kill switches, and IPv6 leak protection to protect user data.

Make sure you visit their blog every once in a while to see if anything changes.

8. IVPN – Yes

We had a quick chat with someone from tech support, and they confirmed their Hong Kong VPN servers are still online. Since they don’t store user data and their servers’ hard drives are completely encrypted, they don’t have much to worry about.

There is no indication at this time that we will remove our server from Hong Kong. If our presence helps support privacy and security in Hong Kong (or anywhere), we will persist.

We keep no user data on our VPN servers – no logs, no historical connection details, no bandwidth usage, no traffic history – and our server hard drives are fully encrypted. If a server was seized, it would be of little value with no customer details available.

If we ever receive any indication that we are forced to log or modify our setup, we will shut down our servers immediately to prevent that from happening. We are monitoring new developments in this matter and will respond accordingly.

Don’t forget to bookmark their blog so that you can quickly find out about updates.

Note

IVPN’s no-logging claims have been independently verified, so it’s safe to say the authorities have no way of putting their users’ privacy at risk.

9. PrivateVPN – Yes

Someone from PrivateVPN confirmed their servers are still online and running well. When we asked them if they planned on pulling out of Hong Kong, if things got worse, they said it’s not something they’d consider doing unless they’re forced to.

No, I don’t think so, because we have a lot of satisfied customers who use the Hong Kong server.

However, if there is any new law that is breaching our customer’s privacy, we will take action. For example, if our provider(s) forces us to start collecting logs, we will choose to cancel the contract instead and, in the worst case, stop offering our privacy service in such a country.

PrivateVPN also mentioned how they previously canceled a contract with a data center because they wanted to force them to keep logs. So they definitely take user privacy very seriously.

You should be able to keep track of any new developments on their blog.

10. ibVPN – Yes

We talked with one of their support reps through the live chat option. According to them, the Hong Kong servers are still running, but they’re not 100% if they will shut them down or not.

At this moment, they are available. We do not know yet if they will be brought down. If that is the case, we will announce it.

So make sure to check their blog for announcements regularly.

11. ProtonVPN – Yes

They already have an article on their blog detailing why they decided to stay in Hong Kong. We also wrote an in-depth article covering their decision.

After much deliberation, we have decided to keep our servers in Hong Kong, not only because we believe we can keep them secure, but also because we believe in fighting for Hong Kong.

Even if the authorities were to pressure ProtonVPN into compromising user data, they say they’d first try challenging those measures in a court or through other legal means. Only if that fails will they shut down their servers.

And because they have experience handling servers in high-risk regions, ProtonVPN has taken extra measures to make sure their servers and users’ data are safe:

  • They use their Secure Core feature to route your traffic through servers in countries with strong data protection laws before you connect to their Hong Kong servers.
  • They don’t keep any logs or personally identifiable information on their servers.
  • ProtonVPN only uses physical bare-metal servers so that they can control them down to the hardware level.
  • They tightly control who has access to the servers and constantly monitor them for potential tampering.
  • All their servers feature full-disk, block-level encryption.
  • Lastly, they don’t have any staff or a physical presence in Hong Kong or China.

They recently posted this article too. According to it, ProtonVPN will be donating 50% of its revenue to two civil rights organizations in Hong Kong between July and August 2020.

So if you want to upgrade your account or are thinking of buying a subscription, now’s a really good time to do it. You can also donate to their cause here.

Remember to check their blog often for updates.

Note

Even though they still maintain VPN servers in Honk Kong, ProtonVPN recommends not using them if you need to secure sensitive online communications. They suggest using their servers in Malaysia, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea as an alternative.

12. Perfect Privacy – Yes

One of their support reps answered over email and told us their Hong Kong server is working just fine. Perfect Privacy also confirmed they don’t have any plans of shutting it down.

Our server in Hong Kong works fine, and we have no plans for this location.

Here’s the link to their blog. Make sure you bookmark it and check it regularly for updates.

13. VyprVPN – Yes

We reached out to them on their website, and one of their support reps confirmed VyprVPN still runs VPN servers in Hong Kong.

We will continue to stay with Hong Kong severs. If there is any change, we will definitely update it here.

Besides regularly checking their blog for updates, you should also check their servers pagelike they suggested.

14. Windscribe – Yes

We got a quick response from one of their support reps who confirmed users can still connect to their Hong Kong servers. He also confirmed they’ll keep the servers running until the authorities or data centers force them out.

The Hong Kong servers seem to be fine. For now, we will keep the servers unless they kick us out.

For new updates, make sure to regularly visit their blog.

15. PureVPN – No

They posted an article on their blog detailing why they chose to shut down their HK servers.

Bearing in mind our commitment to maintaining the trust of our millions of users across the globe, we have decided to decommission Hong Kong servers from our apps and offerings on July 28 at 00:00 HK local time.

While we don’t see any direct threat and we may very well be in the clear, we’ve decided to do this out of a lack of clarity of the repercussions that this recently enacted National Security Law will have on the integrity of our VPN servers in Hong Kong.

So even though PureVPN is a certified no-log VPN now, they decided to be proactive and not take any unnecessary risks. Maybe they’ll bring back their HK servers in the future. But for now, they suggest using their servers in Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, and Singapore instead.

For new updates, keep an eye on their blog.

16. HIDEme – Yes

A customer support representative from HIDEme confirmed the VPN still offers servers in Hong Kong. They also made it pretty clear they don’t plan on stopping support any time soon.

We will continue to offer Hong Kong servers.

Here’s their blog if you want to check it for other updates (which we highly recommend doing).

17. IPVanish – No

Inquiries about VPN servers in Hong Kong will get you redirected to this article on their blog. The piece clearly states that IPVanish shut down its Hong Kong servers, and says users in the region should use its servers in Singapore instead.

It is our responsibility to protect the privacy of our users above all else. And in light of the new national security legislation imposed in Hong Kong, and resulting encryption export laws, we are not comfortable allowing IPVanish users to connect to an endpoint in the region.

Effective immediately, we’ve decommissioned our Hong Kong VPN servers and suspended operations in the region.

Don’t forget to regularly check the announcements on their blog.

18. StrongVPN – No

StrongVPN has an article on their blog stating they no longer run servers in Hong Kong. If you check their VPN server locations, you’ll see Hong Kong doesn’t show up anymore.

The reason is that operating servers in Hong Kong are no longer safe. They recommend using their servers in Singapore and Malaysia instead if you’re in Hong Kong.

Earlier this month, China passed its new national security law. The law brings Hong Kong under the control of China, including their infamously-strict internet regulations.

In response, we’re shutting down all Hong Kong server hardware effective immediately.

Here’s the link to their blog, where they post their announcements.

19. AirVPN – No

We reached out to them through email and were pointed to this forum thread. There’s a post from the AirVPN staff there, which confirms they took their VPN servers in Hong Kong offline.

We are very sorry to inform you that we are withdrawing all of our servers in Hong Kong.

Because of the new legal framework allowing unlimited line wiretapping by Chinese entities without judicial overview, the painful decision is due and undelayable.

Luckily, AirVPN users in Hong Kong can still rely on the provider’s servers in Japan and Singapore for smooth connections.

To stay up-to-date with the latest decisions, make sure you check AirVPN’s forums regularly.

20. SaferVPN – Yes

SaferVPN covered the situation in Hong Kong at the beginning of this month, urging people there to use their service to enjoy better privacy. That’s a good hint that they still offer servers in Hong Kong, but we decided to ask them anyway. And one of their support reps confirmed it for us.

Yes, the servers work for Hong Kong.

Keeping an eye on their blog for new updates is a pretty good idea.

21. VPNArea – Yes

We contacted them over email and got a response confirming their VPN servers in Hong Kong are still operational. VPNArea also emphasized they don’t keep any logs, and that they closely monitor their network to make sure user connections are 100% secure.

Our Hong Kong servers, just like any other, operate in strict ‘no logs’ environment, and we monitor them for any security concerns regularly.

Our customers can also use servers overseas, not necessarily a local one.

We couldn’t find a blog on their website, so we recommend regularly checking their server list and/or FAQ section instead.

22. CactusVPN – Yes

We reached out to CactusVPN and got a response from Sergiu Candja, their CEO. He confirmed that CactusVPN users can still use the Hong Kong server since they don’t keep any logs.

At the moment, we have decided to continue operating our server in Hong Kong. If the situation gets worse, though, we might have to reconsider our options.

You should check their blog out regularly for the latest updates.

23. FastestVPN – Yes

Their Hong Kong servers are still going strong. When we asked them if there’s a chance they’d take the servers offline if things got worse, they told us that:

No, there are no such plans in the near future.

Don’t forget to check their blog every few days for updates.

24. UltraVPN – Yes

One of their support reps told us their VPN servers in Hong Kong are active and continue to operate them.

Yes, we’ll continue to provide support for the Hong Kong region.

We couldn’t find a blog on their site, so you should check out their list of locations as often as you can.

25. TunnelBear – No

Their support reps redirected us to this well-written and informative piece on their blog. It clearly says that TunnelBear shut down its VPN servers in Hong Kong.

Starting today, TunnelBear will be disabling its Hong Kong servers in order to ensure the safety of our users.

The provider made it clear they don’t keep any logs, and that their decision to shut down their servers has nothing to do with that.

Instead, it’s completely tied to TunnelBear not wanting the new law to endanger their technical ecosystem. Basically, they store configuration keys on their servers (the only data they store), and they don’t want them to be at risk.

Remember to check their blog often for new updates.

Note

TunnelBear also said they recommend their Hong Kong users to start connecting to their servers in Japan and Singapore. Apparently, they scaled up their capabilities to offer a smoother experience.

26. Mullvad – Yes

We reached out to them over email, and one of their representatives confirmed their Hong Kong servers are still up and running. You can check that for yourself right here. Just set the country filter to Hong Kong.

However, the wording of their answer implies they might take them offline if things get too bad.

We are following the situation in Hong Kong, and if we deem that having servers there does more harm than good, then we will shut them down.

They recently published this article where they recommend not using those servers if you are in Hong Kong and need to protect your privacy.

Mullvad also suggests using their WireGuard Multihop feature or their bridge service for better security. Ideally, you should choose two different locations with different jurisdictions.

They do recommend avoiding one Multihop combination to make sure you’re really safe in Hong Kong:

Your device –> Hong Kong WireGuard Server –> SOCKS5 Proxy

We highly recommend keeping a close eye on their blog.

27. AstrillVPN – Yes

We had a quick chat with one of their support reps, and they reassured us that their Hong Kong servers are still active and will continue to stay that way.

There are no current changes with Hong Kong servers. We will notify you and other clients as well if there would be changes due to the current situation in that region.

You should also bookmark their blog and check it out every few days to see if there are any updates. You’ll likely get them through the app too.

28. Zenmate VPN – Yes

We emailed Zenmate VPN about what’s currently going on in Hong Kong, and they told us their servers there are still up and running. Since they have a no-log policy, local authorities can’t put user privacy at risk at all.

We’re keeping a close eye on the situation in the city. We’re worried about the effects this vexed national security law might have, and it’s more important than ever to make sure the people of Hong Kong have a VPN they can rely on.

However, our servers are as safe in Hong Kong as they are anywhere in the world. That’s because we have a strict no-logs policy and rigorous procedures for maintaining our server fleet.

Remember to visit their blog as often as you can to get the latest updates.

29. HideMyAss! – No

HMA has an article on their blog where they detail why they decided to shut down their Hong Kong VPN servers.

We’re here to report that HMA has temporarily moved our encrypted servers currently in Hong Kong to nearby locations. It’s not a decision we’re happy to make, but while we learn more about how the new laws in Hong Kong will be enforced, we feel it’s a necessary, responsible step to safeguard our users’ fundamental privacy rights.

HMA emphasized they’re removing their physical servers from Hong Kong. So there might be a chance they’ll set up virtual locations there, giving users access to Hong Kong IP addresses.

That’s just speculation on our part, though. Things might change in the future, so be sure to check their blog regularly for new updates.

30. Encrypt.me – No

Like HMA, Encrypt.me also published an article on their blog confirming they pulled their servers out of Hong Kong.

At Encrypt.me, the privacy and security of our customers come first. With the passing of the new national security law in Hong Kong, we’ve decided to remove Hong Kong servers from our worldwide VPN network. While we would never log any data transmitted by our users through our VPN network, we feel the new laws endanger the privacy of our users.

Their article recommends users to connect to nearby servers in Singapore and Taiwan for a similar experience.

We highly recommend checking their blog for new updates every once in a while.

31. Namecheap VPN – No

We sent them a message over live chat, and one of their very helpful support reps quickly responded and told us the provider no longer offers VPN servers in Hong Kong.

Unfortunately, it was decided to remove the Hong Kong location from our server list. We are sorry for any possible inconvenience.

If you want to stay up-to-date with what’s going on with Namecheap VPN, we suggest bookmarking their blog and checking up on it often.

32. OverPlay – No 

We had a chat with them over email, and one of their customer care reps confirmed OverPlay shut down its Hong Kong servers.

We no longer offer services in Hong Kong, we’re afraid, due to the new laws put into effect by China.

Unfortunately, we couldn’t find their blog to link it here, so we recommend keeping tabs on the web page where they list their servers instead.

33. AceVPN – No

They responded over email and told us that they have temporarily shut off their servers in Hong Kong. They recommend their Hong Kong users to use their servers in Australia, Japan, and Singapore instead.

We are monitoring the situation and have temporarily turned off the HK servers. We have servers in Singapore, Australia, and Japan, so we’d suggest connecting to those instead of Hong Kong.

Since the servers are shut down temporarily, you should definitely check their blog often to see if they post any new updates about this situation.

34. Hotspot Shield – Yes

We got a prompt response from one of their customer support advocates that makes it clear that Hotspot Shield doesn’t plan to pull their servers out of Hong Kong.

Thanks for contacting us. We understand your concern about the situation in Hong Kong. Let us clarify this for you.

Our servers keep running, and our plan is to keep them active. Rest assured, our service is not going to be interrupted.

Make sure you keep an eye on their blog for any new updates about this.

35. VPNCity – Yes

We reached out to VPNCity over live chat on their site, and they quickly responded and told us their Hong Kong servers are still up and running. They also mentioned that besides physical servers, they also have virtual servers in Hong Kong.

So far, there are no updates, but we do have HK servers, and they’re still working. Plus, we also have VPS in HK.

Remember to check their blog for the latest updates regularly.

36. VPN.ac – Yes

They responded over email pretty fast. While VPN.ac did confirm their Hong Kong servers are currently running, they mentioned they would most likely shut them down soon. Unfortunately, they couldn’t offer a specific date.

On the plus side, they said they would start increasing bandwidth capacity for nearby locations (Taiwan, Japan, etc.). So Hong Kong users will have reliable alternatives to fall back on.

We’ll most likely drop them.

The only reason they are still there, for now, is that the hosting partners are not companies registered in HK; also, there is no influence yet by the GFW on the data centers connectivity in HK. But as far as we’ve heard, the GFW deployment is going to happen.

Anyway, when we cancel those servers there, we will increase bandwidth capacity nearby, like in Japan, Taiwan.

So because they might turn off their servers at any time, we highly recommend checking their announcements and this support article as often as you can.

37. VPNSecure – Yes

We had a talk with one of their support reps using the live chat feature on their site, and they confirmed VPNSecure’s Honk Kong servers are still online. They also said there currently are no plans to take them offline in the future.

Everything is in control on our end. Nothing is going to shut down at the moment.

Don’t forget to regularly visit their blog. If there are any changes, they’ll likely post about them there.

38. Ghost Path VPN – Yes

One of their support reps told us the provider hadn’t made a final decision yet, but their servers in Hong Kong are still operational.

We haven’t come to a final conclusion yet, but our servers have no logs for anyone to search.

Since they emphasized they don’t keep logs, there’s a chance they’ll keep running their HK servers in the future since the authorities can’t compromise them.

Here’s their blog. You can check it for new updates about this situation every now and then.

39. GooseVPN – Yes

They answered over email and confirmed they’re not planning to get rid of their Hong Kong servers at the moment. Still, they did make it clear they might consider shutting them down if things get too bad in the future.

Thank you for the message.

We currently do not have any plans to remove our existing server(s) in Hong Kong. If the situation gets too bad, we might consider removing the server.

GooseVPN has a blog you can follow to keep up with their latest updates.

40. Speedify – No

We sent them an email, and got a prompt reply from Alex Gizis, their CEO. He told us Speedify pulled out of Hong Kong because the region no longer meets their users privacy and security standards.

He recommended using the servers in Singapore and Tokyo instead since both locations offer smooth speeds.

Speedify no longer has any servers in Hong Kong.

The new national security law gives the Chinese government the ability to demand the contents of any server in Hong Kong. Speedify users demand exceptionally high levels of security and privacy, and we cannot operate in a country in which those requirements may be compromised. Our servers in Singapore and Tokyo can be used as replacements, and they both provide excellent coverage.

For new updates about their service, keep a close eye on their blog.

41. TigerVPN – N/A

42. VPNUnlimited – No

We heard back from them over email and were told they decided to temporarily shut down their VPN servers in Hong Kong – at least until they manage to improve things server-side.

After hearing news of the new security law passed in Hong Kong that could potentially affect hosting providers and VPN services, we had to temporarily disable our servers there.

This new law, if passed, may force ISPs and hosters from Hong Kong to censor and monitor content like in the rest of mainland China.

Our team is currently working on improving our server-side to make sure that we won’t be affected by these changes, as the privacy and security of our users is our main priority.

Our VPN server in Hong Kong should be available again as soon as the server-side is ready. We don’t have the exact ETA right now, but we will notify our customers once it is ready.

Thanks for your patience and understanding!

For the latest updates, make sure to check VPNUnlimited’s blog and KeepSolid’s blog, too (the company that owns VPNUnlimited).

43. Trust.Zone – N/A

44. Switch VPN – N/A

45. Anonymous VPN – N/A

46. CyberSilent – N/A

47. DefenceVPN – N/A

48. Le VPN – Yes

Le VPN got back to us over email and told us their servers are still running, plus they only have exit nodes there, which don’t store any logs. They did mention they will shut down their Hong Kong servers if the authorities try intercepting their traffic.

We only have VPN exit nodes hosted in Hong Kong. Those exit nodes don’t log or store any information related to our clients or VPN connections as we apply a zero-trust security model.

We are concerned about the situation in Hong Kong, so we will remove the HK servers from our VPN network if we suspect even the smallest risk of traffic interception.

Remember to check their blog regularly for new updates.

49. BulletVPN – Yes

We talked with them over live chat, and they told us their Hong Kong servers are still going strong, and there’s no indication they’ll take them offline any time soon.

The new regulations in Hone Kong won’t potentially affect our VPN service since we don’t keep any user-identifiable logs. We’ll keep our users updated if anything happens.

Make sure you keep a close eye on their blog for the latest updates.

50. Easy Hide IP + VPNTunnel + FrootVPN + Anonine + boxpn (5 VPN Providers Ran by the Same Company) – Yes

We put all these services together because the same company owns them. We talked with support reps from all of them, and the answer is the same: their VPN servers in Hong Kong will stay online for now.

Currently, we are not planning to shut down our Hong Kong servers.

Here are the links to all their blogs:

But it’s safe to say that if Hong Kong servers go offline for one service, they’ll go offline for all of them.

51. IronSocket – Yes

We chatted with them over email. While they weren’t able to offer a comment about the situation in Hong Kong, they were able to confirm that their servers there are still operational (and will be for a long time).

We are sorry, we cannot provide comments/opinions of the situation here.

But rest assured that as long as the servers are needed, we will keep them running.

Remember to check their blog on a regular basis to see the latest updates.

52. VPN.asia – Yes

We sent them an email, and they quickly responded, telling us their HK servers are still going strong. The support agent said that even if things get too bad, they can just move the servers to a different location. That probably means they can set up virtual locations in Hong Kong instead of physical servers.

All our servers will stay online. No reason to shut them down.

We can always move them to other locations.

Make sure you bookmark and check their blog as often as you can. That’s where you’re likely to see the latest updates.

53. FrostVPN – N/A

54. GoTrusted – Yes

They responded over email and told us their VPN servers in Hong Kong are currently active. They said they’d only consider shutting them down if they believe it’s too risky for their users to connect to them.

If the event they have to shut down their servers, GoTrusted said they’d offer a “satellite location” for their users. By that, they mean nearby servers that provide optimal speeds (so Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, etc.). They also said they have other strategies they want to try before it comes to that, but they can’t make them public yet.

Our servers will continue running as long as we feel those Hong Kong data centers have not been compromised. In the event that we feel there is too much risk to customers or their privacy, we will need to shut the servers down and provide a satellite location for users in China.

We will then use server locations outside of China but near it for the best performance and redirect the VPNs to those locations. When we release a new version of the client, we will remove the Hong Kong location since that will no longer be accurate. This is assuming the current Hong Kong location becomes compromised.

We have other tricks that we are going to try, but unfortunately, we can’t discuss these publicly.

Here’s their blog where you can look for new updates. It’s a bit dated, though, so it’s very likely they’ll let users know through the app if their servers go down.

55. Keenow – Yes

The good news is Keenow confirmed their servers are still active, and that they don’t plan on shutting them down due to the current political situation.

The even better news is that they’re working on adding obfuscation to their VPN service to help their users bypass potential VPN blocks in the future.

We will never drop a server location due to political tension. We are currently working on new Stealth technologies, so even if it gets blocked by the Great Firewall of China – we’ll have a way to override it.

Unfortunately, we couldn’t find their blog. Instead, we suggest bookmarking their interactive server network map and checking it regularly.

56. MyIP.io – Yes

They responded over email and told us they want to keep fighting for Hong Kong, so they’ll continue running their HK servers.

Thank you for taking the time to reach out to us.

We believe we can keep our Hong Kong servers secure, so we decided to keep them. We also believe that fighting for Hong Kong is important. At this time, there are no plans of dropping our Hong Kong servers.

For the latest updates about their servers, make sure to regularly check their blog.

57. OctaneVPN – N/A

58. OneVPN – N/A

59. PandaPow – Yes

They responded quickly and told us their HK servers are still active, and that there are no plans to shut them down any time soon.

We do not plan on shutting off any servers, they will remain online.

You could check their blog for updates, but there don’t seem to be any articles there. So we recommend keeping an eye on their FAQ section – specifically this question “Where are PandaPow’s servers located?”

60. PrivateTunnel – Yes

They confirmed their servers are still operational and said there are no immediate plans to shut them down despite the current political situation.

We are continuously monitoring the situation. At this time, there are no immediate plans to shut down the servers in Hong Kong.

We will let our users know if this becomes imminent.

You should bookmark their blog and check it every few days to see if there are new updates.

61. proXPN – No

They replied over email and told us their HK server isn’t working at the moment. They said they’re doing everything in their power to get it up and running again.

We also asked them to let us know when their server is operational again. We’ll update this article as soon as they get back to us.

Our VPN server in Hongkong is not available at the moment, our team is working on bringing it back. We apologize for the inconvenience.

You could check their blog for updates, but it seems a bit outdated. There’s also this page where they list their servers. But, unfortunately, they don’t list their status. So the HK server shows up but isn’t listed as unavailable.

Your best bet is to ask them directly or revisit our article every few days to see if we posted an update.

62. Seed4Me – Yes

They offered us a detailed reply telling us they’ll keep running their HK servers for as long as they can. They also said users have nothing to worry about since they don’t keep logs, and everything is encrypted.

Seed4Me also mentioned an interesting point we haven’t heard yet – that maybe some providers already wanted to pull servers out of Hong Kong because renting them was too expensive. And the national security law was what pushed some of them to do that.

It’s an interesting theory, so we’d be more than happy to hear your thoughts about in the comments or on social media.

Thank you for your question!

We think that the real reason why VPNs give up providing Hong Kong servers is that servers for VPN are extremely expensive there.

We mean, bandwidth is expensive as hell. Or you can get a cheap, deadly slow and buggy server that nobody will like.

The enactment of Hong Kong’s national security law was a straw that “broke a camel’s back”.

If we refuse the HK location in the future — this means we didn’t manage to find a good provider there too.

Regarding the new law: most things are encrypted, and we don’t store any sensitive data on VPN nodes itself.

We also never received any requests from the Hong Kong government.

You should keep a close eye on their blog for any new updates.

63. Shellfire – Yes

We asked them about their HK servers, and while their reply wasn’t too positive (they might shut them down soon), it confirms those servers are currently still active.

That is a very good question. In fact, we are currently discussing this topic. It is very possible that we will have to move our servers elsewhere.

We also asked them if by moving their servers elsewhere, they meant they’d start using virtual locations. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. They confirmed they’ll shut them down if they have no choice.

Remember to check their blog often for new updates.

64. SlickVPN – Yes

We sent them an email asking them if their HK servers are still going strong. They told us they’re still operational, and confirmed they don’t plan on shutting them down in the near future.

However, they did acknowledge there might be a chance they’ll be forced to do that.

We would be happy to assist. We do not have any immediate plans to shut down and servers. Time will tell if we will be forced to.

To keep up with the latest changes, make sure you check their blog regularly.

65. SmartDNSProxy – Yes

Their billing admin got back to us over email and told us SmartDNSProxy is currently making changes to their fleet of servers. He confirmed their VPN servers in Hong Kong will continue being available.

Thank you for your message.

We are now in the process of changing all our global VPN network servers, including the Hong Kong location. We will keep our servers there.

To stay up-to-date with the latest changes, we recommend regularly checking their news section and press releases.

66. WorldVPN – Yes

We asked them if they were planning on shutting down their VPN servers in Hong Kong, and they promptly replied with a short but clear answer:

No, we will keep them up.

They don’t seem to have a blog, so you should check their VPN servers web page regularly instead.

67. ZenVPN – Yes

We contacted them over email, and one of their support reps told us ZenVPN wants to keep running the VPN servers in Hong Kong for as long as they can. They did mention that it depends on how long their upstream provider (a large ISP that offers web access to local ISPs) lets them do that.

We plan on keeping the servers online as long as our upstream provider allows us.

It seems like they don’t have a blog, so keep a close eye on their VPN server locations web page.

68. ZorroVPN- Yes

They told us over email that their VPN servers in Hong Kong are still operational.

We plan to keep the server in Hong Kong. And people are free to use it or not.

To find the latest ZorroVPN updates, you should keep an eye on their news section.

69. ZPN – N/A

70. ZoogVPN – Yes

They responded pretty fast and told us their HK servers are still operational, and that they don’t foresee shutting them down any time soon.

Thanks for your email. We don’t have any plans to discontinue the Hong Kong server nor any reasons to do so.

Make sure you keep a close eye on their blog for any new updates.

Anything You’d Like to Add?

If you know of other providers that continue offering or stopped offering VPN servers in Hong Kong, let us know.

Also, if you know any recent developments about the situation in Hong Kong, please tell us about them.

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