23 Privacy Breaching Firefox Add-Ons Removed by Mozilla
  • Mozilla’s CEO has revealed a plan to integrate a VPN service into a premium Firefox version.
  • The VPN service could be supported by ProtonVPN, who is already a partner of Mozilla.
  • Firefox needs to get more competitive, as well as to generate more revenue while keeping its users safe.

Mozilla Firefox is continually looking for ways to increase the privacy and security of its users, introducing essential features on that part every month. In March, they brought an encrypted file-sharing service to the browser called “Firefox Send”, and then at the end of the month, they introduced Lockbox, an experimental password manager and account syncing tool. In May, we explored Mozilla’s plans to add Tor inside Firefox as a “Super Private Browsing” mode, while now, Mozilla’s CEO Chris Beard has uncovered the company’s plans for a Premium version of the browser that will come with a built-in VPN service.

Mozilla has established a partnership with ProtonVPN since October 2018, but so far, Firefox users could only benefit from it by purchasing subscriptions to the service at a lower cost (about 15% of discount). ProtonVPN is one of the premium VPN (Virtual Private Network) solutions that have scored well in our extensive testing thanks to its speed, strong encryption, and polished user interface that makes it easy to use.

Beard focused on cases like trying to access banking services while using public WiFi. The risks that arise from unsafe scenarios like this one can only be mitigated through the use of a reliable VPN solution. In the same time, Firefox will be able to make additional and much-needed revenue by offering its users something they already want. Right now, 90% of Firefox’s revenue is generated from search, but the cooperation with Google is taking place on a brittle platform and on terms that cannot be negotiated.

While the plans for a premium Firefox version have not been laid out in detail, it is expected that we should see such a version land by October, later in the year. Mozilla hasn’t decided on the exact path that they will take anyway, as they will first launch some of the new services they envision, and then they’ll determine what business model makes sense. Whether free users will be able to enjoy some of these new services or not, it is unknown at this point, but we reckon that Mozilla will try to include something for them as well since that market share really needs some ramping up right now. Along the same lines, Opera is already offering a pretty good integrated VPN service on their browser, free of charge and with no limitations whatsoever.

Would a built-in VPN service be enough for you to give Firefox another chance in the future? Let us know of your opinion in the comments section down below, or on our socials, on Facebook and Twitter.